The Proper Role Of The Presidency! Constitution Alive Segment Six Part Four: Our Constitution is still alive and applicable today! As citizens, we all have a duty to study the Constitution, to understand where our rights and our freedoms are laid out in that document, and how our government structure should work. The reason our government continues to overstep its boundaries is that “we the people” don’t know what those boundaries are! Tune in now for the last part of our four-part series! 

Air Date: 06/13/2019

On-air Personalities: David Barton, Rick Green, and Tim Barton


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Transcription note:  As a courtesy for our listeners’ enjoyment, we are providing a transcription of this podcast. Transcription will be released shortly. However, as this is transcribed from a live talk show, words and sentence structure were not altered to fit grammatical, written norms in order to preserve the integrity of the actual dialogue between the speakers. Additionally, names may be misspelled or we might use an asterisk to indicate a missing word because of the difficulty in understanding the speaker at times. We apologize in advance.

Faith And, The Culture

RICK:

You found your way to the intersection of faith and politics this is WallBuilders Live

with David Barton and Rick Green. You’ve joined us in a four-part series from Constitution Alive!

It’s actually Section Six out of Constitution Alive! That’s the chapter where we cover the presidency and we talk about how to get the presidency back into its proper constitutional powers. Today is the conclusion.

It’s a four-part series; so, if you missed the first three parts earlier this week, they’re all available for you right now at WallBuildersLive.com. We’re going to pick up right where we left off yesterday.

If you would like to learn more about the entire Constitution Alive! DVD program and workbook, it can be found at ConstitutionAlive.com. We’re going to pick up where we left off yesterday; here’s Constitution Alive! where we’re talking about the presidency.

 

Constitution Alive!  Executive Orders

Over time, beginning with Washington, you started having executive orders from the president to make sure that the laws were faithfully executed. That’s perfectly fine as long as the executive order is executing a law that Congress has actually passed, according to the Constitution. If you’ve got a law that’s been passed by the House and Senate, signed by the president, or allowed to go into law by the president without being signed, not overturned by the court, this is a legitimate law that creates some agency or some process the president has to see that that’s executed faithfully.

Sometimes they have to issue orders about how it’s going to be executed. As long as that is within the purview of how the law was passed, it’s perfectly fine. So, presidents have always done executive orders.

I think Reagan did about 280 or something like that. Bush had about 300. I don’t know what the number is on Obama at this point; but, they’ve all done it.

The Problem with Executive Orders

The difference is when a president issues an executive order that is not a law passed by Congress, that’s a problem. Or, when the president issues an executive order that’s the exact opposite of what Congress passed as a law. Let’s say that Congress is considering a law.

And, last year they said “no” to that law. But, this year they might be having it work its way through the committee process. If the president just says, “Well, I don’t care; they’re taking too long, and I’m going to do it by executive order,” that is not the proper constitutional function of an executive order.

It’s an unconstitutional executive order. And, that’s why you heard a lot from members of Congress saying, “Whoa, whoa, whoa, this is not right. This is the president acting on his own and is a very–really a tyrannical–use of power.” So, that’s a real problem as well.

Again, many presidents have ventured way too far on this issue. And, we just keep getting further and further until I think now, we’re so far out there it’s a real problem. It’s got to be reined in.

Recess Appointments

Congress is the body who has to do it. You take you take these recess appointments Congress has to push back by standing up and saying, “We’re not going to approve another appointment until you reverse those appointments, executive orders that are unconstitutional.” We can sue; so, I’m sure people are suing.

It’s going to make its way the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court may overturn it; they have a couple of times, overturned executive orders. Congress needs to stand up and say, “We don’t agree with that executive order; here’s a law actually reversing it.”

So, these are these are battles that, again, you’ve got to have people that are willing to say, “The Constitution is more important than one party or another party’s political agenda.” It’s always got to be that the process has to be defended, the concepts these guys put in place have to be defended.

Moment From American History

This is David Barton with another moment from America’s history. The key to a self-governing nation is self-governing people. And, the key to personal self-government is to live by the standards in God’s word. If someone cannot control himself by those standards then our Constitution certainly will be unable to restrain him.

Understanding this, John Adams declared, “We have no government armed with power, capable of continuing with human passions, unbridled morality, and religion. Greed, ambition, revenge, or seduction would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is holy and adequate to the government, of any other.”

John Adams believed that successful government rested not upon our great Constitution but rather upon moral and religious people. For more information on God’s hand in American history contact WallBuilders at 1-800-8-REBUILD.

RICK:

So, we’re doing the most important part right now. We’re getting educated. Now, it’s our job to go back and help get them educated and choose leaders that will take that oath seriously.

God in the Constitution

We covered a lot of ground there on the presidency. But, there was a question about oaths, and it reminded me that you actually do a whole talk on God in the Constitution. There’s a CD of that there’s going to be included in the package here, so folks can go dive in deep there.

You cover oaths in that a little bit; but, give us a little bit of taste of that. How important are those oaths? And, how do you get people to uphold them?

DAVID:

Yeah. The way the Founding Fathers believed you upheld oaths was you were more scared of God than of not following your oath, because if you take an oath of office nobody really knows if you lied or not; but, He does.

RICK:

So, that’s not about you. If I take my oath, it’s not so you hold me accountable to that oath, it’s because I know God’s going to do it.

DAVID:

You don’t need it; but, I’m agreeing with you to give you permission that you nail me if I lie.

RICK:

Yeah.

“It Binds the Conscience With the Strongest of Ties.”

DAVID:

And so, what it does is it is, they said in another document: “It binds the conscience in the most strongest ties.” It’s what gets you up here and says, “You know what? I promised God; I can’t break my word. I might can do a lot of things with people and turn my back on them, and they wouldn’t know I was doing it and whatever—”

RICK:

A lot of that stuff does happen behind the scenes. If you’re going to hold a public servant accountable, there’s going to be times where there’s committee meetings no one knows what’s happening, or back-room deals. It’s just part of the—it’s going to happen.

DAVID:

That’s right.

RICK:

You want that person to be thinking about that oath and that conscience.

DAVID:

And, you will find that in those early state constitutions, including the one written by Ben Franklin in 1776, the Constitution of Pennsylvania, it said, “We don’t want you holding office unless you believe there’s a future state of rewards and punishments.”

RICK:

So, if you didn’t have faith in an oath–I mean, if you didn’t think that an oath would hold you accountable and you don’t believe in God, we don’t want you there because we can’t hold you accountable in that back room.

The Oath Clauses

DAVID:

Now, Rick, if you say, “I swear before God I’ll do this,” you just put a burden on yourself that says, “I swore before God.” But, if you say, “Oh, I’m going to do that,” I have to trust your goodness. And, maybe you’re a good guy; maybe you’re not.

So, for some political officials, maybe they are; maybe they aren’t. But, by doing the oath the way they did it–and see, there are books out there that are called, like The Godless Constitution, suggesting that this is all secular stuff. You can only say that if you know nothing about history and nothing about what the Founders did.

So, let’s take the oath clauses, because there are five clauses in the Constitution. Oaths are a big deal to the Founding Fathers. And, from their standpoint, there is no such thing as a “secular oath.”

What Did the Founders Say?

Let me just run you through some of their quotes.

RICK:

Okay.

DAVID:

James Madison said, “An oath is the strongest religious ties.” I’m sorry; secular people may not like that. An oath as a religious tie.

You have here John Adams who said, “Oaths in this country are as yet universally considered as sacred obligations.” It’s a religious obligation.

You have James Iredell. He’s a ratified the Constitution and was put on the U.S. Supreme Court by George Washington. So, here’s this Supreme Court justice here who says, “According to the modern definition,” which modern definition of 1788, back then.

“According to the modern definition of ‘oath,’ it is considered,” and, by the way, this was done at the ratification convention of the US Constitution in North Carolina. So, at the ratification events, he’s talking about the oath clauses, and he says, “According to the modern definition, right now, today, of an ‘oath,’” in 1788 when they ratified this thing–

RICK:

He’s in the middle of a debate; so, this isn’t some random letter later. This is the middle of debate.

A “Solemn Appeal to the Supreme Being”

DAVID:

He says, “It is considered a solemn appeal to the Supreme Being for the truth of what is said by a person who believes in the existence of the Supreme Being and a future state of rewards and punishments.” An oath is God, I’m saying this knowing I will have to account to You someday and being cognizant of the fact I’m going to have to account to You; so, I’m giving you my word.

RICK:

So, if you don’t believe in God, then that part doesn’t hold any weight.

DAVID:

Well, then it’s on the goodness of man.

RICK:

Yes.

DAVID:

And, there’s not a whole lot in me that says, “The goodness of man is great.” Just look back across the 20th century and look at about 150 million lives that were lost because Stalin wasn’t good, Hitler wasn’t good, Tojo and Pol Pot weren’t good. The goodness a man, if it worked, we wouldn’t have a prison anywhere in America; but, it doesn’t, and that’s what the Founders knew.

So, that’s James Iredell. Then, you have Oliver Wolcott, who’s a signer of the Declaration and was the governor of Connecticut. This is what he says, “The Constitution enjoins an oath upon the offices the United States.

“This is a direct appeal to that God who is the adventure of perjury. Such an appeal to Him is a full acknowledgment of His being in Providence.” Now, he’s talking about the oaths in the Constitution. He said, “The oaths in the Constitution, they are a direct appeal to God who is the adventure of perjury.”

RICK:

Okay, so how could it be a “Godless Constitution” if these guys are saying, right there out of the Constitution—

Advice and Consent Clause

DAVID:

Five oath clauses that are, all five, religious clauses.  Let’s continue. John Quincy Adams, who–by the way, kind of fun thing to know about the Advice and Consent clause in the Constitution—which, John Quincy Adams was appointed to the US Supreme Court and confirmed.

Now, He wasn’t in the country when it happened, and they didn’t have a hearing on him. But, the advice and consent–the Senate knew him and his capabilities. They knew that he is a great guy to have on the court; but, he turned it down because at the time, he was negotiating the Treaty of Ghent to End the War of 1812.

RICK:

Wow.

DAVID:

So, to come home and be a Supreme Court justice, he’s going to have to leave the country in a lurch, because he’s trying to bring an end to the War of 1812.

RICK:

He’s putting the country ahead of his own ambitions.

DAVID:

So, he is nominated and confirmed to the Supreme Court. And, he is not a legal guy with a very bright mind. This is what he said.

Religion + Constitution = Strength

He said, “The Constitution has provided that all the public {functionaries should}, not only in the federal government, but also the state governments, should be under oath or affirmation for support.” We take an oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States. Even if you’re a state official, you take an oath to uphold the Constitution.

He says, “The homage of religious faith was thus super added to all the obligations of temporal law to give us strength.” So, he’s saying, “We’ve just tied religion to the Constitution to give it strength.” This is what drives the “Oath Clause” home, is we’ve made it between you and God.

So, here are some more.

RICK:

Before you do this one– so that’s just a reminder to me of the difference between the whole French Revolution and liberty without God, and our liberty with God. It’s almost like it’s religion and faith are the glue that’s really making all this work. These pieces wouldn’t work so well if you didn’t have religion as a part of it.

Even down to a public servant upholding their oath.

DAVID:

Well, you and I, if we go to the moon and breathe there, we’ll die because that’s not our atmosphere. And, if you take a secular atmosphere with the Constitution, it will die, because that was not its atmosphere. It was birthed and created in a religious atmosphere.

And, if you try to take that atmosphere, if you take that air out of the room, it will suffocate and die, because it’s not made that way.

And, here’s another good example, Rufus King is a signer of the Constitution who said, “In the oath which our laws prescribe, we appeal to the Supreme Being to deal with us here after, too,  as we observe the obligations of our oaths.” He said, “The pagan world were and are without the mighty influence of this principle which {should proclaim} the Christian system.”

There is a Creator.

RICK:

Man, so here again, the difference between our formula and other formulas, the reason it’s worked so well, is because in this Christian system, we have this mighty influence of accountability to God for those oaths. That’s huge.

DAVID:

And, that’s why in the Declaration, again of the six principles, number one is There is a Creator. He created you; therefore, He can tell you what to do. Then, you have to answer to your Creator someday; so, that was the belief.

Here’s another one.  John Witherspoon signed the Declaration and trained a number of the Founding Fathers as president of Princeton University. He said, “An oath is an appeal to God, the Searcher of hearts, for the truth of what we say and always supposes a calling down of His judgment or us if we lie.”

He says, “Persons in public office are obliged to make oath that they will faithfully execute their trust. In vows, there is no party but God and the person himself who makes the vow.” When you take an oath, it’s between two people: you and God.

It’s not between you and guys or you and the nation; it is between you and God. That’s what the oath is. He continues, “An oath, therefore, implies a belief in God and His Province, and is indeed an act of worship.”

The Constitution has Five “Acts of Worship”

RICK:

Wow.

DAVID:

You mean the Constitution has five “acts of worship”? Yeah; it’s got a lot more than that. But, this is what—I’m telling you, these are the guys that did this and helped write this.

One final example: George Washington’s, in his Farewell Address said, “Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert our oaths?”  

If oaths become secular and you don’t feel like you’re accounting to God—

RICK:

There’s no guarantee there. You can do anything.

DAVID:

There’s no guarantee.

Invite a Speaker to Your Area

Tim:

Hey, this is Tim Barton with WallBuilders.  And, as you’ve had the opportunity to listen to WallBuilders Live, you’ve probably heard a wealth of information about our nation, about our spiritual heritage, about the religious liberties, and about all the things that make America exceptional.

And, you might be thinking, “As incredible as this information is, I wish there was a way that I could get one of the WallBuilders guys to come to my area and share with my group.”

Whether it be a church, whether it be a Christian school, or public school, or some political event, or activity, if you’re interested in having a WallBuilders speaker come to your area, you can get on our website at www.WallBuilders.com and there’s a tab for scheduling. If you’ll click on that tab, you’ll notice there’s a list of information from speakers bio’s, to events that are already going on. And, there’s a section where you can request an event, to bring this information about who we are, where we came from, our religious liberties, and freedoms. Go to the WallBuilders website and Bring a speaker to your area.

DAVID:

How do you get people to observe their oaths? You get to be cognizant of God. You get to be aware that they will answer to God.

And, if they lie to us, the people, they’re going to have to deal with God.

A Fear of God

RICK:

And, this is not one person here. You’ve gone through the Father of our Country, signers of the Constitution, signers the Declaration. I mean, all these huge Founding Fathers.

RICK:

I’ve got all these {who were not} even the signers. I’ll give the commentaries they wrote afterwards. Go through their legal or through the courts’ legal rulings.

This is not like I’ve concocted something here; rather, it is all over their documents.

RICK:

And, this comes straight to that Exodus 18:21; they’ve got a fear of God. Now, those key elements: if they fear God—

DAVID:

“Able men, such as fear God.” Not one or the other. You need able men who fear God.

Accountability

RICK:

Yes; then, that oath will mean something. Which means, when we’re choosing, we need to be thinking about how the oath that this person is going to take for their office, doesn’t mean anything unless we choose people that believe in God and actually want to be held accountable.

DAVID:

Exactly. And, you better choose people that way, because 99 percent of what they do, as you pointed out, is done in private.

RICK:

Yeah.

DAVID:

If you think of 10,000 to 13,000 bills, generally, every year that are introduced in the federal, Congress you can probably name five.

RICK:

Yes. You don’t know half of what’s going on. Well, let’s take a presidential example, in terms of what a president—this is Article 2 here in this particular section. So, some of the things the president does that most people—

DAVID:

Absolutely.

RICK:

How about some of those appointments? We had a question on exceptions that don’t have to go to through the Senate.

Presidential Appointments

DAVID:

That’s right.

RICK:

So, this is going to be an action where nobody is going to be able to hold the president accountable. And, the Founders thought there were some things that you should do that for, have some of those exceptions. But again, that’s thinking you’re going to have a president in place who will follow and uphold that oath.

DAVID:

That’s right. The fact that a recess appointment now means you’re gone for three days—

RICK:

Yeah.

DAVID:

And, by the way, they went for Christmas and New Year break. So, I’m taking a federal holiday, as designated by law, and that’s a recess? You’re going to do national—

RICK:

I’m not going to use it to push somebody through.

DAVID:

Now, why did the Founding Fathers do it so that there would be two branches involved in presidential appointments? And, by the way, the question was asked. The Congress just passed this law that included certain things; and, as a general principle, we don’t want that; we want to be accountable.

Postmasters

But, part of what happens, and the reason the Founding Fathers did that was, also included in presidential appointments until 1960s, was postmasters. Now, postmasters are not going to make or break the United States of America. That’s an administrative office that doesn’t exercise any power.

They may be inefficient and incompetent; but, that doesn’t break the nation. So, it’s not an abuse of power. And, in the ’60s, Congress passed the law says, “Hey, postmasters, let’s not have Senate confirmation on them anymore; that’s not a danger.”

And so, what happens is, with now more than 1,000 agencies–some say as many as 13,000 federal agencies–the president has thousands of appointments to make. Some are just clerical and don’t have decision-making power. They just they have to execute their duty, and those are not really the people you want to confirm.

But, that’s not what happened in these other recess appointments where they’re trying to cram people through that the Senate opposed already.

RICK:

That’s right. Those were appointments that really do have a major impact and should not have been snuck through as recess appointments.

The Federalist Papers

DAVID:

That’s right. And so, when you look at that Appointments Clause, “With the advice and consent of the Senate.” How come we just don’t let the present pick his own guys? The Founding Fathers answered that.

As a matter of fact, go to the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers are their commentary on the Constitution, which were written to help ratify the Constitution.

RICK:

They were looking ahead to see how this thing is going to work.

DAVID:

And, the three authors there were Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton. Now, here’s what they said about why you have two branches involved in a nomination. When you have a nomination that you want somebody to confirm that, here’s what it explained.

Original Intent of Senate Confirmations?

It says: “It would be an excellent check upon a spirit of favoritism in the president and would tend greatly to preventing the appointment of unfit characters.” If he can put in whoever he wants and nobody can say, “Whoa, that guy’s incompetent,” or, “That guy has got a criminal record;” if you can’t have somebody to be a check and balance, then he can run through everybody that is—

RICK:

He can appoint his cousin, brother-in-law.

DAVID:

Yes, you have nepotism. It says: “He would be both ashamed and afraid to bring forth from the most distinguished and lucrative stations, candidate who had no other merit than that of coming from the same state to which he particularly belonged, or being some other way personally allied to him, or possessing that necessary insignificance and pliancy to render them a obliquus instruments of his pleasure,” that is, just as political hacks: I’m rewarding my guys, putting them in office. Or, these are my guys and they’re going here.

That’s why you have the second branch of law.

RICK:

But, that only works–we still see some of this, because the Senate’s not doing its job.

DAVID:

It’s not doing its job.

RICK:

It’s not setting of these alarms. You know, if the president’s allowed to just put anybody in that they want, then the Senate’s fallen down on their duty.

Uphold the Constitution, Not the Election

DAVID:

Well, if the Senate says, “You know, the president won the election. With that, he won—”

RICK:

Yeah, I’ve heard that.

DAVID:

No, you didn’t take an oath to uphold the election; you took an oath to uphold the Constitution.

RICK:

That’s right. And, unless you, again, worry that you’re going to have to answer to God for what you do, then why not just rubber stamp anything?

RICK:

Yeah.

DAVID:

But, if you have to answer to God for upholding the Constitution and protecting the liberties of the people, now you’re a whole lot more independent from anything that any party wants or anything that any person wants.

“Master Builder” of the Constitution

Here’s another one. Roger Sherman is one of the six guys who signed the Declaration and Constitution. Actually, he is called the “master builder the Constitution.”

He’s the guy who came up the bicameral system, the House and Senate, which then we used in the electoral college.

RICK:

When you use that phrase “master builder,” does that mean that he came up with major components?

DAVID:

Well, “master builder” is, you had 55 guys there, and some were a whole lot more active than others. We often call James Madison the “Father of the Constitution,” which is kind of nonsense, because he has a letter that says, “You can’t call me that.”

RICK:

He said, “Don’t call me that.”

DAVID:

Well, they said that he, more than any other, had. And, he said, “No, no, no. There were a lot of minds.”

And so, what historians used to say was that you have Roger Sherman, George Washington, Charles Pinckney. Actually, Charles Pinckney, nobody talks about; but, the Constitution looked closest to all the things he proposed. He’s the guy who got it most right for what the people chose.

RICK:

Wow.

DAVID:

But, you have you have James Madison, George Washington.

Fingerprints on the Constitution

RICK:

You see his fingerprints more than anybody else’s.

DAVID:

You see his fingerprints. And, Sherman is one of the guys who, you can see his fingerprints in the Electoral College, the bicameral system, others. I mean, what he came up with, the other guys liked and included a lot of it.

So, that’s why they called him “master builder.” Now, we call Madison the “Father of the Constitution” because in 1946, they discovered an unknown manuscript of Madison’s where he went through and trashed religion, all the things he’d done as president, and in the first Congress. He said, “I’m the guy who voted for the appointment chaps in the Congress and really wish I hadn’t done that. I wish we didn’t have chaps…”

RICK:

So, he reversed.

The “Father of the Constitution” or Not?

DAVID:

He reversed. But, it was private; it was a secret. Nobody, no Founder ever read it; nobody knew it was there until they found it in 1946.

And, suddenly, he’s the “Father of the Constitution.”

RICK:

Now they want him.

DAVID:

Now he’s the guy.

RICK:

Because he’s saying things later against it. And, those were things he did out of office, private.

DAVID:

Oh, yeah; this was years later.

RICK:

Instead of paying attention to what he did as a representative of the people.

DAVID:

His actions were very clear. As president of the United States, I think he had eight, 10, or 12 proclamations calling for days of prayer and fasting. And, he says later in old life, “I wish I hadn’t done any of that.”

So, he goes there and just repudiates himself. I mean, he’s just double minded on this stuff. And, rather than looking at what he did–because who cares what he believed individually, because the other Founding Fathers  set up laws and stuff that were different. Now, we say, “His personal opinion later in life that no one ever agreed–”

RICK:

Because it fits their agenda, that’s the only reason.

DAVID:

That’s exactly the reason.

Constitution Alive

Have you ever wanted to learn more about the United States Constitution but just felt like, man, the classes are boring or it’s just that old language from 200 years ago or I don’t know where to start? People want to know. But, it gets frustrating because you don’t know where to look for truth about the Constitution either.

Well, we’ve got a special program for you available now called Constitution Alive with David Barton and Rick Green. It’s actually a teaching done on the Constitution at Independence Hall in the very room where the Constitution was framed. We take you both to Philadelphia, the Cradle of Liberty and Independence Hall and to the WallBuilders’ library where David Barton brings the history to life to teach the original intent of our Founding Fathers.

We call it the QuickStart guide to the Constitution because in just a few hours through these videos you will learn the Citizen’s Guide to America’s Constitution.  You’ll learn what you need to do to help save our Constitutional Republic. It’s fun! It’s entertaining! And, it’s going to inspire you to do your part to preserve freedom for future generations. It’s called Constitution Alive with David Barton and Rick Green. You can find out more information on our website now at WallBuilders.com.

 

DAVID:

Madison did have an impact on the Constitution, no question. But, he’s one of many. RICK:

That’s why I love your approach. You step back and say, “We’re going to look at all these guys and learn from all of them. And, here’s another one that most people hadn’t heard of; he’s a master builder.”

Roger Sherman

DAVID:

That’s right; he’s a master builder. And so, in talking about why it is that the Senate and advises and consents the president on nominees, this is what he said.

He said, “If the president alone was investor of the power of appointing all officers and was left to select a counsel for himself, he’d be liable to be deceived by flattery and pretenders to patriotism who would have no motive but their own profit and self-seeking gain.” He says that we can help recognize and flush out some of these guys that are that are just mere people looking for their own profit, who want to build their own resume.

He said, “We can help make sure you get people in there who are willing to serve.”

RICK:

Because there’s accountability from another branch. It’s not just one person.  

Joseph Story

DAVID:

And, then finally Justice Joseph Story, who was put on the court by President James Madison. He did the famous commentary on the Constitution. If people want to buy a good book on the Constitution, you can buy that reprinted 1833 Commentaries on the Constitution.

There is one that’s called The Familiar Exposition of the Constitution; it’s one volume.

His actual work was three volumes long, and it’s very thorough. It goes to every clause of the Constitution and is great.

But, in his Commentaries on the Constitution, this is what he said. He says, “The consciousness of this check will make the president more circumspect and deliberate in his nomination for office.” If he knows that he has to get them by somebody who’s watching, he’s going to be a lot better in his choices.

RICK:

Yeah.

DAVID:

And, that’s why we have the Advice and Consent clause. So, the question about What happens when the Congress takes some out? Well, if they’re postmasters and that kind of stuff, you don’t worry about it.

But, the reason they were put there in the first place is to make sure we don’t get bad folks heading government agencies.

RICK:

Accountability. You know, we’ve talked a lot about abuses of power and things that get done in private. So, you want to have people you can trust.

The Courts

It’s time to talk about the courts, because we see a lot of things being done in terms of no accountability with the courts. And, in our next chapter, we’re going to dive into the courts and Article 3. We’re going to learn about some myths of the judiciary.

But, before you go to that section, be sure watch that little clip with Brad Stine where we talk about the Electoral College: the World Series of politics, when we come back here on Constitution Alive! with David Barton and Rick Green.

Constitution Alive! with David Barton and Rick Green.

RICK {IN STUDIO}:

Hope you enjoyed this four-part series on the presidency out of Constitution Alive! with David Barton and Rick Green. That’s just one section out of 11 in the entire Constitution Alive! program, which is on DVD and a workbook. You can find out more at ConstitutionAlive.com.  

But, if for some reason you tuned in today for the first time and missed the first three parts of this particular section on the presidency, that’s all available to you right now. You can go to WallBuildersLive.com. All the links are free.

Get on there and listen to it, share it with your friends and family. Let’s do our part in restoring this constitutional republic. You’ve been listening to WallBuilders Live!