Thanksgiving- How Do We Appropriately Celebrate This Holiday?

Thanksgiving- How Do We Appropriately Celebrate This Holiday: In today’s episode we are learning the real history behind Thanksgiving and addressing questions such as, “Is Thanksgiving a day of mourning?” “Why are we celebrating a day when the Pilgrims killed the Indians?” “Didn’t they steal land from the Indians?” And more! Tune in now to hear the answers!

Air Date: 11/20/2018

Guest: Paul Jehle

On-air Personalities: David Barton, Rick Green, and Tim Barton


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Transcription note:  As a courtesy for our listeners’ enjoyment, we are providing a transcription of this podcast. Transcription will be released shortly. However, as this is transcribed from a live talk show, words and sentence structure were not altered to fit grammatical, written norms in order to preserve the integrity of the actual dialogue between the speakers. Additionally, names may be misspelled or we might use an asterisk to indicate a missing word because of the difficulty in understanding the speaker at times. We apologize in advance.

Faith And The Culture

Rick:

Welcome to the intersection of faith and the culture. This is WallBuilders Live! We’re talking about today’s hottest topics on policy, faith, and the culture. Always from a biblical, historical, and constitutional perspective.

We’re here with David Barton, America’s premier historian and our founder at WallBuilders. Tim Barton’s with us, national speaker and pastor, and president of WallBuilders. And my name is Rick Green, I’m a former state representative from Texas.

You can find out more about us at WallBuildersLive.com and also WallBuilders.com. And if you enjoy today’s program, or any of our programs, and you’d like to hear more of them, you can go to that WallBuildersLive.com website and get some of the archives from the last few weeks and listen to those programs as well.

And you can even come alongside us and be a partner and help us make this program more available to more people. David, Tim, this is a listener supported program, wouldn’t happen without those folks out there to support us and come alongside us. We often quote the founders – lives, fortunes, sacred honor. So lives, that’s our time. That’s the investment into putting together programs like this, or studying the Constitution, or whatever folks may be doing with their time to invest in freedom. And fortunes is just like it sounds – that’s our money. That’s investing in things we’d like to see a good return on. I would say WallBuilders Live is a good investment with a good return.

Tim:

Yeah, Rick, we would think so. We certainly hope and pray that we are faithful stewards when people choose to support and give to what we’re doing. And certainly, we think what we are doing is not only when God has called us to, but it’s something vital for the culture. Which is probably no coincidence why God maybe called us to this. But certainly, God has given us a unique voice, a unique platform, a unique opportunity, to present things in a way that a lot of times people aren’t hearing from the biblical, historical, constitutional, perspective that we certainly try to provide here.

So, we’re very grateful for those that would come alongside us to support what we’re doing and make programs like today, and the programs we record and we air everyday, possible. As well as so much of what we do with WallBuilders whether it’s working with young people and training the next generation. Whether it’s working with pastors, or state legislators, or even being in D.C. working with US congressmen and senators. God has given us a lot of unique opportunities and part of the reason we’re able to do that is because people come alongside and support so much of what we do. So, we are so grateful for the people that do support and partner with us in this.

Thanksgiving Week

Rick:

Well, speaking of those programs that bring a historical perspective to whatever the topics might be of the day, the hot topics of the day. Obviously this week is Thanksgiving, so not necessarily a hot topic depending on how hot lunch is that week or depending on how much we debate the origins of Thanksgiving, but it’s certainly a topic of this week. And actually, it has been a rather hot topic in past years in terms of schools not wanting to talk about Thanksgiving being thanks to God at all, and that’s still a political hot potato, I guess you could say.

So, we’ve got Paul Jehle coming on later in the program. Dr. Jehle is an expert certainly on the Pilgrims and that first American Thanksgiving.

David:

Yeah, it’s interesting the way Thanksgiving is being taught today. It’s really crazy in some aspects. We had a contact from a professor who said, “I was telling my kids about Thanksgiving and what it represented, and one of the students said, ‘No, you’re all wrong. Thanksgiving is a day of mourning. That’s when the Pilgrims killed the Indians. And Thanksgiving was about them giving thanks for having killed the Indians.’”

And she provided the professor with the 11 modern article showing that. How that in some degree the Pilgrims– tere were some atrocities they committed toward the Indians. Whether it was killing them, or stealing their land, or whatever it was. So, the professor was like, “What do we do?”

We produced a piece that answered all of the modern claims that showed the historical facts and documents that went back to the actual truth. And we’ve actually got that on the website. And that’s really good piece for people to see. If they go to the WallBuilders website you’ll see there the piece for Thanksgiving. And just search on the website for “Thanksgiving” and you’ll get all the stuff to deal with what we’re hearing today that’s so wrong.

Misrepresentation of History

Tim:

We also have a short little pamphlet on Thanksgiving. We have lots of things on our website- some that are for purchase, some that are just articles to inform people what’s going on. But certainly something we’ve seen a lot of misrepresentation of historical facts when it comes to Thanksgiving and the Pilgrims. I remember we had a school group in and they were coming to tour the museum and one of the history teachers that came with them told the students that the Pilgrims were not religious, they came to America for gold, and they stole all the land from the Indians. Which, all of those are pretty much exactly the opposite of who the Pilgrims were and what they did.

David:

Not “pretty much” exactly the opposite. They are exactly the opposite.

Tim:

But this was a high school teacher teaching students about the Pilgrims. And again, spreading a narrative that is not based in any historic fact. And this is where so much of the culture is that we’re spreading stories not based on historical, factual, information or evidence, but just based on a narrative that has been embraced by many academics. Which is, again, why we love having somebody like Dr. Paul Jehle on who has done so much research, knows the Pilgrims story better than probably just about anybody else, maybe, other than like the Pilgrims themselves. He really is able to present a lot of this information from a very historical and factual basis.

David:

Yeah, it’s an interesting thing because Plymouth, Massachusetts is where the Pilgrims made their home. That’s what they called the home after they landed. So, they’re in Plymouth, Mass. He’s the town historian for Plymouth Massachusetts. So, he actually knows this stuff really well. He’s handled so many of their original things and so many of the original documents.

And he’s a pastor of a church and they run that church the same way the Pilgrims ran their church. It’s a congregational style church which was unique in that day. So, he really is someone who has a full grasp on the truth and also he knows what the fiction is about the Pilgrims because he’s immersed in that absolute truth that that does exist to them.

Visit Plymouth!

David:

So, Paul Jehle, great friend, great historian. And by the way, go to Plymouth, see where the Pilgrims lived. It’s a great place to be. Tim and I have got a special coming up on TBN network for Thanksgiving where Tim and I actually are in Plymouth. And we went to the locations where the first Thanksgiving happened, and where the Pilgrims signed the peace treaty with the Indians, and so many other cool things – where their first church was, where their first fort was.

So, if you go to Plymouth, it’s a great trip, it’s a great visit, but Dr. Jehle is a great guy to let you know what’s there in town. And they also now have the second largest Thanksgiving parade in America. Macy’s is number one in New York City, but number two is the little town of Plymouth – 100,000 people a year come there. And that’s a parade that, really, Paul Jehle has been just instrumental in helping get that thing going. So, wonderful guy, wonderful historian, Dr. Paul Jehle.

Rick:

Dr. Jehle will be with us when we come back. Stay with us – you’re listening to WallBuilders Live.

Join Us In Israel!

Hey guys what are you doing January 28th through February 7th? If you said you don’t know, let me give you an idea. We are going to Israel. Rick Green, my dad, David Barton, Tim Barton, our families are going and we would love for you to go with us. We are going to the Holy Land if you’ve ever been to Israel this is something as a Christian that will make you forever read your bible differently.

To see where Jesus walked, where He lived, where He did miracles, where so much of the Bible took place. If you’ve ever read through the Bible and you’ve given it a mental picture, the mental picture will not do justice of what happens when you’re actually on the ground. If you’ve ever thought about the story of David and Goliath and you’ve envisioned what it looks like, we’re going to go to the actual field where it took place.

There are so many things that you will see that literally makes the Bible come to life. In fact, that’s the name of the tour group we’re going with is The Bible Comes to Life. Go to CMJacksboro.com. You can click on the link, it has an Israel itinerary, all kinds of details. Hope to see you on this trip this coming year.

Rick:

Welcome back. Thanks for staying with us here on WallBuilders Live. Thrilled to have back Dr. Paul Jehle, Plymouth Rock Foundation’s executive director, just all around great guy too. Great speaker as well. You ought to go to his website and book him in to come in and speak. Pastor, Dr., Paul Jehle, thanks for coming on, brother.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Hey, great to be here again.

The Biggest Thing to Recognize

Rick:

Hey, great time to, of course, talk about Thanksgiving. First of all just to be more thankful, let alone the history of Thanksgiving. But we tend to lose that sense of gratitude the more we get a little spoiled I think. But Dr. Jehle, let’s go back in time. Talk to us about the history of Thanksgiving because it seems like we kind of have a warped view of this whole thing. We certainly do everything we can to remove God from our equation here in America. Was Thanksgiving started to thank God or to thank the Indians? What were the Pilgrims doing?

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Well, I think the biggest thing to recognize is that Pilgrims never invented Thanksgiving.  Obviously, they came to thank God for their harvest, but the dating of a fall festival called Thanksgiving goes all the way back to the Feast of Tabernacles in the Old Testament. And this was called the Feast of Thanksgiving. And we– now, we don’t think that Christians were celebrating it as Jewish festivals in England. There was a harvest festival. This was not the first time that people would thank God for harvest in the fall.

We think that the Pilgrims, of course, in 1621, when they held that, it was with the natives and they were very blessed to have a peace treaty with them. And they certainly did thank them because without the natives they wouldn’t have survived. But at the same time, there was nothing secular for the Pilgrims. So, they would have thanked God for the harvest, they would thank God for their neighbors, they would have thanked God for the air and everything they had. They never wanted to be having an entitlement mentality.

Their whole doctrine of Thanksgiving was you thank God because we don’t deserve a thing. And when you think about it that way, you’ll be grateful for the smallest things.

A Part of Foundational Philosophy

Rick:

Yeah, and it seems like that remained a part of our foundational philosophy for a couple hundred years. Didn’t we tend to, even as a government as you move forward in our history continue to have that attitude to some extent?

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Yes. And the thing is that they recognize that the Natives themselves gave thanks to God the Creator. And this was an idea that was very very prominent. In fact, after the Pilgrims, that first 1621 Harvest Festival, like clockwork, New England governors from all the states eventually would call days of prayer in the spring, in March, and then days of Thanksgiving in October. It was just like clockwork that, look, you ask God for a great season and then when it comes, regardless of whether you had some drought, regardless of anything else, you thank God. So, this was this prayer and thanksgiving pattern that continued all the way well into the 1800s.

Rick:

As much of an effort has been made to remove God from the culture and that idea of thanksgiving to the Creator, you guys have made huge strides in Massachusetts, which is not what you would call a conservative state these days. But you’ve made huge strides over the last decade or so at restoring and bringing back that celebration of Thanksgiving and the true history of the Pilgrims. Tell us a little bit about that.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Yeah, well basically we had the opportunity to serve our town and we inherited a Thanksgiving parade the weekend prior to Thanksgiving and have built it up. It’s really caught on. It’s patriotic. We honor the veterans, we give thanks to God, we portray American history chronologically. It’s a chronological parade. We brought it back.

But the weekend has become a * festival weekend now. We honor the military on Friday night and then we have this historic chronological parade. We begin with the Native Americans, we go to the Pilgrims, we then go 100 years sentiments, we go to the Revolutionary War, and the Civil War, and all the way to the present day. And we even throw in floats to honor the New England teams that win championships. We’ve had a few. S0 they are just getting the Red Sox float ready for this year.

Rick:

Oh, man, must be nice.

Combining Competition at Thanksgiving Is Historic

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Yeah. We’ve gone through those kind of things, but it’s become a real God and country type of family friendly patriotic event which we’re really blessed with. It’s really caught on. We believe we’re like placeholders here. We are saying, “Hey, here’s where–” Now,  it’s not where Thanksgiving literally began, but it’s where that unique festival of friendliness. And you know the interesting thing, I tell people, I say, “Look, historically that three day feast included recreation, contests, and competitive athletic events between the natives and the Pilgrims. We know that from the sources.” So, to combine competition at Thanksgiving weekend is historic.

Rick:

So, the volleyball match we have at my family Thanksgiving, man, we’re being historically accurate.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

There you go.

Rick:

I mean, it’s not the right sport, but–

Dr. Paul Jehle:

We sometimes have people call us around this time and they’ll go to the plantation or go to some other place near here and they’ll just say, “Oh, it was a three day fast.” No, it wasn’t. It was a three day feast. In fact, it was an event where we don’t know a ton of details beyond what’s recorded by Edward Winslow and William Bradford, but we do know that the Pilgrims were wanting to set aside a time to give thanks to God for their blessings and, obviously, to do that in friendly relations with the natives, and to do it in a way where it’s a good thing.

Because the Pilgrims, half of their company had died, there was only four adult women alive at that first Thanksgiving. Yet 90 natives that came and about 50 Pilgrims, that’s 140 people with four adult women. It’s a good thing the natives brought most food. They brought five deer and it would have been really tough to do otherwise.

What This Nation Was Built On

Rick:

Yeah.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

That’s really what built this nation – the idea that communities could get together, and have recreation, and have unity. Boy, we’re missing that.

Rick:

Yeah.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

That’s something that restoring it to have a good time regardless of what you disagree on, emphasize the common elements in our communities, in our town. Boy, how do we we need that.

Rick:

Amen, no doubt about it. So, let me ask you this then as families are getting together  and a lot of families are like ours where they have four different family get togethers, so it’s not just Thanksgiving Day, but the day after that, pretty much all weekend, and you eat a lot. But as we’re getting together and we’re having some of that deer meat certainly and lots of casseroles– I don’t think they had casseroles at the Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving. But anyways, we’re doing all of that. What do you recommend we do to even just taking a few minutes to share a little bit about the history in our nation?

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Yeah. I usually give them the short paragraph that Edward Winslow writes. Like, “They begin now to gather in the small harvest they had to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter.” He talks about some were employed in affairs abroad, some exercised in fishing cod, bass, other fish. And then he talks about the fact that they had wild turkeys and they brought them in and they had this harvest festival. And Governor Bradford talks about our harvest being “gotten in”, “our governor sent four men on fowling.”

Actually Reading the Text of the Pilgrims Is Powerful

Dr. Paul Jehle:

To actually read the text of the Pilgrims at that time is powerful. Gathering everybody together. I do that with our family, with whoever’s there, we gather together, we remind them that they did not have plenty like we have today, and they were thankful, and they thanked God. They said, and Bradford writes this way, he said, “And though it’s not always so plentiful as it is at this time, yet by the goodness of God we are so far from want that we wish you partakers of our plenty. And he’s writing this back to England.

Rick:

Wow.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

And, obviously, you’re having the rest of the church that’s not with them, and he said, “Listen, we don’t have a whole lot, but by the goodness of God we’re thankful.” And here’s the– what a blessed thing. So, I always like to say, “Mix it in.” Just read a paragraph or two from Bradford’s history and you can get it online. It’s pretty easy to do. You don’t have to go buy all the books if you don’t have them.

But I always tell them, do that, pick a few scriptures on thankfulness. If your family is Christian, or centered on Christian attributes, or otherwise, and just talk about being thankful. Because today our whole doctrine of Thanksgiving is dealing with so much on getting rather than just being thankful for what we have. We complain about what we don’t have instead of thanking God for what we do and we don’t deserve anything. And therefore, whatever we have is mercy.

Rick:

Amen.

We Should Be Very Thankful

Dr. Paul Jehle:

And, boy, in this nation we are blessed beyond measure. Most nations are not going to have that kind of thing and we should be very thankful for what we have.

Rick:

So, good. So, good. Dr. Jehle, what a blessing. Really appreciate your time coming on. A website we can send people to – TNTchurch.net, that’s New Testament church. We just enjoy having you on every time.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

And also, of course, Plymouth Rock Foundation.

Rick:

Yes.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

https://plymrock.org. We’re building up to 2020 and a huge massive celebration here in June, late June or July of 2020. Really focusing on the faith of the Pilgrims that brought them from Europe to America. So, I’ll send you– I’ll send off a brochure or something like that. You can make it available and let people know.

Rick:

Please do. In fact, that’s one of the things that the Barton and the Greens encourage other families to do because we’ve experienced that, is vacation with a purpose. Go places where you can really instill those lessons in your kids. What a great opportunity. So, late June early July in 2020–

Paul Jehle:

Or the weekend before Thanksgiving every year. We’re here.

Rick:

Alright, good stuff, good stuff. Yeah, in fact, let’s have you back on later this year or summer ‘19 and talk more about that plan for 2020

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Absolutely.

Rick:

Sounds great. Dr. Jehle, thank you for your time, brother. Really appreciate you coming on.

Dr. Paul Jehle:

Okay, God bless you now.

David:

Stay with us, folks. We’ll be right back with David and Tim Barton.

This Precarious Moment Book

David:

This is David Barton. I want to let about a brand new book we have called This Precarious Moment, Six Urgent Steps That Will Save You, Your family, and Our Country. Jim Garlow and I have co-authored this book and we take six issues that are hot in the culture right now.

Issues that we’re dealing with, issues such as immigration, race relations, our relationship with Israel, the rising generation Millennials, and the absence of the church in the culture wars, and where American heritage is, our godly heritage. We look at all six of those issues right now that are under attack and we give you both Biblical and historical perspective on those issues that provide solutions on what each of us can do right now to make a difference.

These are all problems that are solvable if we’ll get involved. So you can grab the book This Precarious Moment and find out what you can do to make a difference. This Precarious Moment is available at WallBuilders.com.

Plan on Plymouth 2020

Rick:

We’re back on WallBuilders Live. Thanks for staying with us. Special thanks to Paul Jehle for being with us today as well. Be sure and check out the Plymouth Rock Foundation. Also, the church, and we’re also going to be bringing you more information on that 2020 special event in the summer, late June early July. So, as we get closer we’ll bring you more information, but start thinking about planning that vacation with a purpose in 2020 and being part of that amazing celebration that Dr. Jehle was talking about.

Back with David and Tim. Guys, maybe we need to plan on being in Plymouth in 2020. That sounds pretty awesome.

Tim:

I think, actually, we are planning on being there–

Rick:

Oh cool!

Dr. Paul Jehle:

–in 2020. So, hey Rick, if you want to come with us, you’re invited!

Rick:

Hey! Save me a seat!

David:

And, Rick, we’re invited to stay in the first home ever built by the Pilgrims. So, we’re there on the site of that first home, the site where the peace treaty was signed, the site where they kept the Mayflower Compact – they’ve invited us to stay there in that home.

Rick:

Wow.

Tim:

Fortunately, they’ve done a little bit of updates and renovation.

Rick:

Yeah, I was just going to ask – is there air conditioning?

Tim:

So, actually, I don’t think we’ll need air conditioning.

It Doesn’t Take Much to Realize

David:

Not in Massachusetts in November.

Tim:

However–

Rick:

I thought it was in June. I thought we were going in the middle of summer.

Tim:

Well, actually, so we were going to visit, yes. But to do the actual– the 400th Parade on Thanksgiving which is when we’re going to go up there to be with Paul Jehle.

Rick:

Agh, okay.

Tim:

So, that– yeah, we’re not going to be there in the summer, although, that would probably be fun as well. Anyway, so it’s a very cool place to go visit. And one of the things that even as Paul was pointing out, there’s not a whole lot of details given of exactly what happened and how it happened.

But one of the things that’s worth pointing out at least for the narrative sake that’s communicated today, a lot of the narrative today is about the abuse that the Pilgrims did to the Indians – the stealing the land, the mistreatment, the death, whatever it was. All you have to do is look at the interaction that first Thanksgiving and you can quickly realize the Pilgrims really couldn’t have stolen the land or abused the Indians. Otherwise, when the 90 male braves showed up against 50 Pilgrims, which included the women and children,  that would have been the end of the Pilgrims. So, this is where you just start looking at basic history and the narrative against the Pilgrims begins to unravel.

Following the Pilgrims’ Example

Tim:

But I also thought it was interesting where Dr. Jehle talked about you really can’t understand the Pilgrims if you remove faith from them. Because it wasn’t just they were thanking God for having food, or the friends of the Indians, and obviously Squanto coming and helping and doing. It wasn’t just they were thanking God for this one big moment. They were thanking God all the time for everything. Even as he pointed out with a letter they wrote back, “We don’t have much, but we’re so grateful for what we have.” This seems to be such an attitude resonating from their life – not just this one moment.

Although, certainly, Thanksgiving is when we look back and can celebrate following that example, but not just the example of when they feasted with the the Indians for three days, but the idea of making sure we remember to be thankful for what God has done in our life.

David:

And Paul also pointed out that the Pilgrim Thanksgiving was really based on the biblical Feast of Tabernacles. Now, when you look at the biblical feasts, God starts out by saying, “Look, there’s three feasts I want you keeping every year.” And then as their history went along there were a couple more feasts added. You had Pooram which was days of deliverance, etc.

But it’s interesting that biblical Christians used to follow the feasts that God set forth in the Bible. Now, we got away from that and the fourth and fifth century. Some of the Christian church leaders back then, as they were getting away from the Bible which was starting to happen by the fifth century, they became very hostile to Jews, and they rejected Jews, they said they were the children of Satan. My I point out Jesus was a Jew. And may I point out that all the apostles were Jews and–

But nonetheless they got this real anti-Semitic tone by the seventh century. Christian leaders were having Jews wear yellow badges with stars on them kind of like what Hitler did except about 1200-1300 years earlier. So, what happened was as they became really anti Jewish, anti-Semitic, they said we’ve got to get away from these Jewish feasts. They’re not Jewish feasts, their God’s feasts established in the Bible.

Maybe Our Tradition Hasn’t Changed as Much as We Thought

David:

And the Pilgrims understood that and saw that and it’s interesting that even the leader of the Pilgrims, Governor William Bradford, when he was in his 60s began learning the Hebrew language. Now, that’s a dead language at that time for all practical purposes, but he wants to learn it because he said, “I want to hear the language that God spoke in, I want to hear the language that Adam used when he named the animals, I want to hear what that sounded like.” So, the respect that was there for keeping biblical feast was really significant with the Pilgrims.

Tim:

I’m also grateful for the fact he pointed out that they did have a feast for three days and played sports–

Rick:

Yeah, no kidding.

Tim:

–because it makes my Thanksgiving feel much more normal. No, this is actually so I need to actually watch the Cowboy game and then the Lions. I need to eat lots of food.

David:

There was a time when watching cowboy games was actually fun, but–

Tim:

Well, that’s when we used to win things. But, however, so football, and food, in three days. So, probably for them they didn’t have the same feasts kind of thoughts for three days that we did where they probably weren’t sitting on their lazy boys and growing obese eating food, they were just grateful to have food in general, so a little different.

Nonetheless, maybe our tradition hasn’t changed as much as we thought. Other than the fact that they probably remembered God a whole lot more than most Americans do today. So, I would think really coming out of this, something great to remember looking back, is they were people that remembered God in everything they did. And certainly a challenge for us to embrace today is to make sure we remember God – not just at Thanksgiving, but in everything we do.

Thank the Pilgrims

David:

And let me encourage people that that celebration 400, that’s a big deal. And I would really encourage you to give 40 bucks as Paul talked about. That’s a small amount to contribute to thank the Pilgrims for 400 years of positive legacy they’ve given us. Whether it’s the right view of separation of church and state, or the right view of God in education, or whatever. It’s great stuff.

Thanksgiving- How Do We Appropriately Celebrate This Holiday

David:

And Tim and I have been talking with us Congressman about re-menting a coin that was done on the 3oo anniversary, which is U.S. legal tender showing the Pilgrims and the Mayflower, and it’s commemorating them and bringing that back for the 400 anniversary. So, just as an American, that’s a small contribution to make for what the Pilgrims have given us. So, go to Paul Jehle’s website to be able to contribute 40 dollars to this massive 400 anniversary celebration they’re doing. That’s such a small contribution considering all the major contributions the Pilgrims gave us. And we’d encourage you to give 40 dollars to that Pilgrim 400 celebration.

Rick:

Visit WallBuildersLive.com today to find out more details. We’ll have links over to Plimoth Foundation and the dates where you can be sure and be a part of that 2020 celebration. And also as David and Tim were talking about being able to donate to help make it happen. Thanks so much for listening today. You’ve been listening to WallBuilders Live.

2018-11-21T20:22:15+00:00November 20th, 2018|Godly History & Good News|0 Comments

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