Values Voter Summit Interview- Dana Loesch’s Experience At Town Hall: We had the privilege of getting some amazing interviews at the Values Voter Summit. In this episode, we are interviewing Danna Loesch. She is a spokesperson for the Second Amendment and has consistently spoken the truth with boldness. Tune in now to find out what her experience was like speaking at the Town Hall following the Parkland school shooting.

Air Date: 10/30/2019

Guest: Dana Loesch

On-air Personalities: David Barton, Rick Green, and Tim Barton


Listen:

Download: Click Here

Transcription note:  As a courtesy for our listeners’ enjoyment, we are providing a transcription of this podcast. Transcription will be released shortly. However, as this is transcribed from a live talk show, words and sentence structure were not altered to fit grammatical, written norms in order to preserve the integrity of the actual dialogue between the speakers. Additionally, names may be misspelled or we might use an asterisk to indicate a missing word because of the difficulty in understanding the speaker at times. We apologize in advance.

Faith And The Culture

Rick:

Welcome to the intersection of faith and the culture. This is WallBuilders Live! where we’re talking about today’s hottest topics on policy, faith, and the culture, from a biblical, historical, and constitutional perspective.

We’re here with David Barton, America’s premier historian and the founder of WallBuilders. Also, Tim Barton, national speaker and President of WallBuilders, and my name is Rick Green. I’m a former Texas state legislator, national speaker, and author.

We are headed out to the Values Voter Summit. Tim, you had the chance to interview one of my heroes, Dana Loesch. She’s an NRA spokesperson and has a radio show. Ms. Loesch used to be over at the Blaze, really well-spoken.

Former NRA Spokesperson

Dana took on CNN and all the setup there at a town hall a couple of years ago after one of the school shootings, when they just really ambushed her while using these kids as props. She’s always been willing to speak truth with boldness, and you got to do an interview with her, man. That was pretty cool.

TIM:

Yeah, a lot of fun. And, just a point of clarification: She actually is no longer the spokesman for the NRA, although she still is a very active spokesperson related to the Second Amendment. So, her position has not changed.

The NRA was scaling some things back in the midst of internal changes they were making. So, her position has not changed; they didn’t have a falling out. They’re fine.

Nonetheless, she’s someone who has been a very well-spoken, clear voice on some very basic issues. And, she is a person of faith, which does influence a lot of what she does and how she even communicates truth, which when we had a chance to talk certainly came out in that interview.

RICK:

Well, guys, we’re going to jump to break quicker than normal because we’re going to a great interview with her. So, Tim Barton’s going to be back with Dana Loesch right here at WallBuilders Live!

America’s Hidden History

DAVID:

Hi, this is David Barton.

TIM:

And, this is Tim Barton, and we want to let you know about a series that’s happening right now on TBN on Thursday night. TBN is the Trinity Broadcasting Network. Every Thursday night, there’s a series that we’ve filmed called America’s Hidden History.

And, this season is called “America’s Hidden Heroes.” The reason is, we highlight heroes from American history. For years we’ve been focusing on the forgotten history and heros of the nation.

And now, we have a TV show just highlighting some of those heroes.

DAVID:

These are inspiring stories about some of the greatest people maybe you’ve never heard about. We go on location to the sites and show you where the events happened. It’s the stories of folks like Bronco Charlie, Stagecoach Mary, Jedediah Smith, Robert Smalls, and so many inspiring folks.

TIM:

Now, this happens every Thursday night, and the time is gonna be different based on where you live. Either way, we think this is something that will so encourage and inspire you in learning some of these great stories from America’s Hidden History.

Welcome Dana Loesch

TIM:

All right, welcome back WallBuilders Live! This is Tim Barton. We are joined by Dana Loesch.

Dana is someone who is known for being an author and a national radio talk show host. But also, she’s been the spokesperson for the NRA.

One of the things that is iconic in my mind was when there was a “town hall” that was not so much a town hall, although was advocated to be. I’ve never seen someone with so much courage and grace as Dana was in that moment. And so, Dana Loesch is someone that we are so excited to have on the program.

Dana, thank you for being with us today.

DANA LOESCH:

Thank you so much for having me. It’s a real pleasure to be here.

TIM:

Well, as someone who has grown up around guns, I have so appreciated how clear you have been in helping people understand the nature part of the history, of our Constitution, the Second Amendment, the reality of statistics. But, you know, even I’ve heard you many times on your daily radio program.

You go far beyond just guns. And, I know even the Voter Values Summit, you did not really live in what a lot of people have labeled you sometimes, and you’re the Second-Amendment lady, right? But, so much more.

So, I would love to share with our listeners some of the details of maybe what you covered and then anywhere else you want to go.

DANA LOESCH:

You mentioned the town hall. And, that’s where all of this really is was recognized.

That’s where I recognized it.

The journey of getting here and culminating, not really culminating, but even leading to the book that’s going to be out this spring, and really ultimately what my speech was about at this year’s summit. My oldest son who is now 18, in college, going into political science and engineering, is going to go to law school. He wants to go into constitutional law.

He has always been involved in debate and been very political. And, he just has a gift for speaking. My purposes has been to do what God has wanted me to do and get him on the right path and keep him where God needs him to go.

A Huge Lack of grace in Politics

And, I noticed that with him and his generation, there was a huge lack of grace in politics.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

When they would talk or debate, it’s all about destroying the other person. Then, you get a feather in your cap, and it’s awesome, you flex, you’re so hardcore. Great.

I noticed they were all cheering each other on it—because he did compete on a debate team. And, I would ask him, “Did you did you convince anybody?” Then, he’s like, “Well, I won.”

I said, “Okay, that’s great. Did you convince anybody? Did you persuade anybody?

Otherwise, what’s the point?”

TIM:
That’s so good.

DANA LOESCH:

Yeah, you won a tournament. Great.

TIM:
Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

But, did you win somebody’s heart? That’s the trophy.

TIM:

That’s great.

DANA LOESCH:

And, I noticed that that had not really been a focus. That’s not what you’re taught. His debate teacher was amazing.

But, I feel like, as parents, and really in culture, that’s missing. So, that kind of got some wheels turning, Then the town hall happened.

The Town Hall

And, when the town hall took place, it was on a Wednesday. I found out about the town hall Tuesday.

TIM:

Wow.

DANA LOESCH:

And, while I was flying down—actually right when we were boarding, that’s when I learned I was going to be on stage. But I thought it was going to be like in a previous forum, where they just had people sit there and be part of the set.

TIM:

Sure.

DANA LOESCH:

Then, when I got there they said I was actually going to be answering questions and talking. So, it was not a choice to go. With the organization that I formerly worked with, members were kind of freaked out and wanted to make sure that there was some reason, discourse, from our perspective there.

And, that whole flight down—I mentioned in my speech today “sons of thunder” from the Bible because I’ve always most identified with them.

{laughter}

I mean, those disciples are my jam.

TIM:

So, for anybody listening, “sons of thunder” is when the disciples are like, “Jesus, just send down fire and kill ‘em.”

Sons of Thunder

DANA LOESCH:

Yeah, they had so much zeal, but no grace. And, I always thought—and don’t want to say this is how the Bible is—but I was always amused reading Jesus’s responses because I almost can read the eye roll, because He knows that they’re not there yet.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

But, the thing that was amazing is even though they were asking Jesus, “Hey, can You want us to call down some fire? Why don’t we put some brimstone on these people and just snuff them out?” He never cut them off.

He could have kicked them out of discipleship and said, “You’re not perfect right now. You’re not where I need you to be to follow me and go out and spread the word after I’m gone.” He didn’t kick him out but let them stay there and germinate—for the lack of a better way to put it—and grow into what they were supposed to be, the disciples that He needed them to be.

And, I thought That’s pretty amazing.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

And so, I had that kind of in my head. My pastor, Rick Ashley, a Church of Christ pastor, has preached some amazing sermons. And, he mentioned something on that, which was another seed that was in my head. I’m like “okay.”

A Three-Hour Prayer

So, going down to this town hall, it was about—from Dallas, we took off in a horrific thunderstorm. I didn’t even think we were going to actually leave. And, there was so much turbulence on the plane.

I have never had a three-hour prayer before; but, I was in prayer for the entire flight down there. Not an exaggeration: the entire flight down. Because I knew what I was walking into and how important it was.

And, I also knew Why in the world am I the person doing this? not because it’s my job as part of representing membership, previously with an organization, but have you seen me? Have you heard me people? Have you seen me in previous rallies jumping off the stage or confronting people in the street?

So, I was just thinking This is going to be either interesting or really bad because grace is not my immediate response. It is something I have to, not just choose, but convinced myself to choose.

A Gift of Mercy?

TIM:

Oh yeah. Well, as a type-A person—the Bible even talks about in Romans about motivational gifts. And, you can be the giver, the teacher, the administrator. Mercy is always the last on mine every time.

DANA LOESCH:

That’s the last one.

TIM:

I’m never a mercy person {laughter}. Like, no. Like, “You fell down and got hurt? Well, you should not have tripped.”

DANA LOESCH:

That’s not the card you want. Like, “Oh I get this one? Great. Yeah, I don’t want the mercy one.”

Really, our idea of edification obviously is very different from God’s, because we edify the ego, where He’s looking at edification of the spirit.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

And, people want to edify their own ego. They want the back-pats, the clicks,

the likes, the followers, the re-tweets. That’s what it’s about.

And, you don’t get that by being nice to people or forgiving people. You don’t get that by apologizing to people.

And so, I’m thinking about all while going down there, which is really weird because, again, everybody knows me. I am literally a brawler. So, going down there, we get there, and I don’t know how to describe it.

I have never felt more calm and at peace in my life, ever.

TIM:

Wow.

Like the Matrix

DANA LOESCH:

It was as if everything was in slow motion around me. And, I could just see everything so clearly.

It’s like the Matrix when Neo bends over backwards and everything is just super slow. You can easily anticipate every punch because you see it coming from a mile away. And, I felt so calm.

Then, going into the arena where there were 7,000 people who immediately were screaming, “Murderer,” and a lot of other things

TIM:

Yeah, right.

DANA LOESCH:

We have the video where someone had said, “Burn her,” and all of that. But, I did not—I was a little nervous walking in. And, as I was getting up to the stage and this all gets into it, here was Jaylen Martin, who was a student was a student at Parkland.

TIM:

Yes

DANA LOESCH:

He came running up. And, I was just stilling myself, thinking Someone is going to spit at, hit you, or whatever; just keep going. And, he was coming up, and I didn’t know what to expect.

And he said, “Mrs. Loesch, Mrs. Loesch, they’re taking everything. You’ve got to say something.” And, I wasn’t quite ready for that.

I looked at him. He was wearing an Air Force shirt. And, the only thing I could think to say at the time, as my brain’s figuring this out, is, “Does someone in your family serve?” He answered, “Yes, ma’am, my older brother.” And, his was the last smile that I saw that night, as I was getting up on the stage.

TIM:

Wow.

There is a Time for Everything

DANA LOESCH:

Then, everyone saw what happened. That was not a time—there’s a time for righteous indignation, for fury. And, that was not it.

TIM:

Sure.

DANA LOESCH:

It was a roomful of hurting people, many of whom were being exploited, some who were the exploiters. And, I felt for them. There were certain things that I saw.

I saw cameramen try to really zero in on this crying mom’s face while she’s bawling, reading a letter. They were right there, getting that shot, and that really bothered me and stuck with me. So, we did that.

And, when we left, my husband—well, he sat next to—I can’t even think of his name now. One of the one of the Florida representatives down there, who was yelling with everybody else. My husband was restrained, and he was visibly upset.

And, I was with another person with whom I worked with at the organization, who wouldn’t even stand because he was too afraid. He thought he was going to have to run out.

TIM:

Wow.

DANA LOESCH:

We had a woman. There were only two security people with us, and she jumped the stage, trying to get at me. And, I just didn’t care.

Nothing to Be Ashamed About

And, I looked at everyone and smiled. I was not going bow my head or flee. And, just walked out, because I had nothing to feel ashamed about or apologize for.

But, I still empathized, as angry as everybody was. Then, that morning, we had to leave that that second, because I had to be up and backstage at CPAC, because the vice president was going to speak and Secret Service, as you know being here, they’ve got to clear everything out 5,000 days in advance.

So, we got out there, and I was giving my speech. Then, I looked back and saw the CNN camera. And, when I got upset, I wasn’t upset over it for myself.

Righteous Indignation

This is something important when we talk about righteous indignation and outrage. When we’re feeling those things, it needs to be outrage for the right purpose. I was outraged because of how I felt people were being treated and exploited.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

And, I wasn’t outraged for myself because I never got that image of that camera zeroing in and focusing on that mom’s face, to put that on screen for a program.

TIM:

Right.

DANA LOESCH:

And, that’s when I lost it and got pretty sassy-pants about the media, which I still don’t apologize for.

TIM:

Sure.

DANA LOESCH:

Because it needed to be said.

TIM:

Sure.

DANA LOESCH:

Maybe it wasn’t the greatest thing for them to hear. But, it wasn’t meant maliciously. It was meant in truth.

TIM:

DANA LOESCH:

And so, now we’re here. And, when I spoke today, there were a couple of people who came to the book line and said, “Well we thought you would actually speak about guns. It was so surprising that you didn’t, but instead were talking about race, politics, and how we don’t allow people are redemptive path, therefore we cannot have reconciliation, which is the real purpose of a lot of people.”

TIM:

Right.

The Most Successful Pushback

DANA LOESCH:

And, we just need we need more of that. We need so much more of that. I give the example of Chick-fil-A and Dan Cathy and how that was really the most successful pushback against the cancel culture.

And, he wasn’t cross. He didn’t ambush anybody with the camera but was kind and consistent through the whole thing. And, it was hugely successful.

And, now Chick-fil-A what is about to overtake McDonald’s.

TIM:

They are. They’re crushing it.

DANA LOESCH:

So, it works. It does work.

TIM:

Yes.

DANA LOESCH:

And, there is a real need in our culture for that sort of reconciliation and for that grace. There’s a reason why Hallmark is like–they’re showing Christmas movies all the time now, because people are so miserable in their lives they need something. So, they want to go watch Candace and not get taken over by the big city guy, or see how she’s living in this nice house in a town by making snow globes yearlong.

I don’t know, but that’s her job. And, people like that they like that.

TIM:

They do.

Did You Help Change Someone’s Thinking?

DANA LOESCH:

And, that it’s because there’s a real desire to have that in our everyday discourse. So, that’s where I am now. It’s been a very interesting path.

TIM:

Well, Dana, it’s something that you alluded to with your son on debate team. It’s not about Did you win the argument? but rather, Did you help change a heart or mind?

DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

And, as you’re even mentioning grace, one of the things that was evident in the town hall was, there were moments when people said things that were blatantly false and not true. But, you didn’t try to just win the conversation or win the argument. That grace was evident.

And, because you responded in grace, now when emotions change, people can look back and be receptive because there’s not the bitterness or offense of this woman who was here and said these things. And, it’s one of the things even—certainly, as a Christian, I would argue grace is supposed to be part of what we do because of Who God is.

DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

God’s given us so much grace and mercy.

DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

We are supposed to do to others as God has done for us and should let that flow out of us. But, as we walk in grace, it also plants the seeds that—seeds are not harvested in the moment.

GRACE

DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

They’re harvested in the future.

DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

So, now we can look back several years later, on what could not have been a fun experience for you at this—we’re calling it a town hall. It wasn’t a town hall. It was like a lynching, set up to be.

DANA LOESCH:

Yes. It was it was a political lynching.

TIM:

And, it because of the grace—which now makes total sense, that if you prayed for three hours going in, that was not Dana. DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

That was God grace.

DANA LOESCH:

If anyone has ever needed evidence of the existence of God, my demeanor in that town hall was it. My husband would even know. That is not my—I was one time speaking in Wisconsin.

You remember when had those big old union riots and protests.

TIM:

Yeah.

Jumping Off Stage

DANA LOESCH:

So, this was at one of the worst of them. Here I am 5’6,” 130 lbs. And, I’m up there on stage when someone yelled something quite unflattering to me.

I jumped over a monitor, jumped out to the stage, walked right up to that person. And, my husband just about had a stroke. But, that was me.

And, it wasn’t—it was confrontational too, because I was like, “You wronged me, so I’m gonna set you straight right now.”

TIM:

Right.

DANA LOESCH:

It wasn’t for the right purpose. It I have looked cool.

TIM:

Right.

DANA LOESCH:

But, it wasn’t for the right purpose. Ultimately, I look back now and am like—but, ultimately he ended up liking me, because I said that he was wearing the same brand of overalls as one of my cousins. I’m from Southern Missouri and he was a farmer. So, we ended up becoming friends.

But, we just have to explore how we’re approaching things a little bit differently.

TIM:

Yes.

DANA LOESCH:

And, going back to seeing my kids grow up, I realized that. Now, I love that there are so many young people getting involved. May they realize the amazing potential they have if they don’t make the mistakes that we have made.

TIM:

Sure.

DANA LOESCH:

And, not hasten the hardening of the heart but instead maybe be a little bit more grace-minded when they’re reaching out to people, having these conversations.

TIM:

Sure.

Meekness Isn’t Weakness

DANA LOESCH:

It’s not weakness. Meekness isn’t weakness.

TIM:

Right. Right.

DANA LOESCH:

And, you don’t have to compromise with someone. You hold your principles. We know our truths; we know the truth, whether it’s pro-life, whether it’s about Second Amendment, any number of things.

TIM:

Sure.

Separating the Person from the Issue

DANA LOESCH:

But, it’s how we approach it and talk to the other person. And, I’ll tell you, Tim, too. I really feel a lot of individuals on the left take it as a personal offense when you disagree with them, because they can’t separate the person from the issue.

So, you’re not just disagreeing with the issue, you’re personally insulting them because you rejected the issue, so you’re rejecting them.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

And, we have to get around that.

TIM:

Well, and to that point, Dana, I would love to know your thoughts on this. If you’re outside of God, you are looking for purpose and identity.

So, as a Christian, I know who I am. I’m a child of God. I am made His image.

And, my identity is not in what I associate with. But, if there is no God, then you have to find value in something. And, if you find value or passion in climate change or whatever it is, if that’s where your value is—

DANA LOESCH:

Then, you have to find your purpose.

TIM:

Then, if you say, “That’s wrong,” then you’re not just saying the issue is wrong. You’re now saying, “Me,” because I’ve defined myself in this issue.

DANA LOESCH:

Right.

TIM:

And,this is why—

Identity Politics

DANA LOESCH:

It’s identity politics. This is where it comes from.

TIM:

And, this is where your point is; this is where more grace is needed. Because in a culture that is so politically divided, it’s no longer about whose facts are more accurate. We have to reach on a human level to the soul of the individual, and this is where grace is needed.

We’re not just trying to win the argument. We’re trying to win hearts and minds. And, I would say, as a Christian, obviously I want to win them to the ultimate truth of who Jesus is.

But, even in a practical America sense of I can’t help lead them to understand religious liberty or pro life.

DANA LOESCH:

Sometimes you can only plant the seed. Then, God has to do the rest of it.

You mentioned, really quickly, you mentioned the identity politics aspect of it. I have a chapter and literally submitted this manuscript a week ago. So, it’s not going to be until next spring.

But, I discuss identity politics. And, what you said is exactly right. Well, you get it.

And, you’ve been raised right and totally understand it because you identify as a child of God.

We’re of the Kingdom.

TIM:

Yeah.

Little Kingdoms

DANA LOESCH:

That’s how we identify first before anything else. And, not identifying as that first, has allowed all of these other little—I don’t know what you want to call them, “little kingdoms” to pop up.

TIM:

Yeah.

DANA LOESCH:

And, people focus on issue or Well, this is my identity first. No, no, no. We’re all children of God.

That is all of our identity. Quit self-segregating, first off, because that’s creating further division. You’re absolutely right on that.

TIM:

Well, Dana we’ve been talking a long time. I can’t keep you forever, although we would love to. But, the speech you gave it Values Voter Summit will be online for everybody listening.

Also, Dana, you are all over social media. You have so many books. A new one is coming out the spring.

We probably would like to get you back on to do a book-promo interview when that happens.

DANA LOESCH:

Because that’ll be interesting to see how it’s received. People are just probably expecting me to come out with a gun book. We’ll see.

TIM:

But, we’re in a season where grace is needed. And so, this is a great topic to be bringing out. Dana, thank you so much for being on the show with us.

DANA LOESCH:

Thank you. Appreciate you.

This Precarious Moment Book

David:

This is David Barton. I want to let about a brand new book we have called This Precarious Moment: Six Urgent Steps That Will Save You, Your family, and Our Country. Jim Garlow and I have co-authored this book and we take six issues that are hot in the culture right now.

Issues that we’re dealing with, issues such as immigration, race relations, our relationship with Israel, the rising generation Millennials, and the absence of the church in the culture wars, and where American heritage is, our godly heritage. We look at all six of those issues right now that are under attack and we give you both Biblical and historical perspective on those issues that provide solutions on what each of us can do right now to make a difference.

These are all problems that are solvable if we’ll get involved. So, you can grab the book This Precarious Moment and find out what you can do to make a difference. This Precarious Moment is available at WallBuilders.com.

A Passion for Truth

RICK:

Welcome back to WallBuilders Live! Thanks for staying with us.

If you were with us before the break, you were actually with Tim out at the Values Voter Summit and got to hear the interview with Dana Loesch. Tim, cool interview.

And, it’s nice to have someone that can speak so boldly on these issues. As you said at the beginning of the program, she comes from the same perspective we do, with a passion for truth.

TIM:

Well, I appreciate a lot too, the point she made that we don’t have very much grace in politics anymore. And, when you don’t have grace, there’s really not the chance for redemption or a path of restoration as she pointed out. And, one of the things that we’ve done for a long time in our Leadership Training Program, Patriot Academy, and all the different areas where we work with the next generation or with young people, one of the things we try to communicate over and over is it’s not just about winning arguments.

It’s about winning hearts and minds. And, as much fun as it is at moments, to have this great slam or comeback, embarrassing or humiliating somebody did not help win them to truth. And ultimately, we will be people that present truth, promote truth, and are trying to win the hearts and minds of people, which is something that, certainly, she highlighted in the interview.

Dana’s New Book

So, I’m excited about this book coming out next spring, where she’s going to delve into this, because this is certainly something we need more of in the culture. And, as Christians, we should be the ones helping lead the way on having conversations full of grace in a culture where if we disagree, it’s because you’re a hateful, intolerant person.

No, no. Let’s have a little grace in this conversation. And, again, this is something where Christians really can help make a difference.

DAVID:

I was really impressed with the journey that she’s had, because as you listen to her, her instinct is jump over the microphone and grab you. She said that one guy—she jumped over the speaker to confront him. They eventually became friends.

But, here she is on a path now of grace, not responding. I love what she asked her son, “You won the debate; but, did you persuade anyone? Did you change any hearts?”

So, the fact that she is taking such a different path, is really intriguing, because somebody has got to start this thing of grace. And, that’s really what is standing out to her. Obviously, it’s not going to be the other side.

Because, Tim, as you pointed out, identity politics: they identify with their issue, and if you attack their issue, you’re attacking them. And, somebody’s got to start the grace.

TIM:

Well, I would say, even as you mentioned identity on the other side, I would clarify the other side are people who generally are secular. Because, apart from God, you’re gonna have a hard time being able to have a reason for extending grace. Right?

We know that as a Christian, we love because He first loved us. That love is supposed to be part of how we live and how people are going to know we’re His disciples, based on how we love each other. So, this is something that, in our love for people, there should be grace in our life.

Values Voter Summit Interview – Dana Loesch

When you mentioned that the other side won’t do that, well, this is where Ronald Reagan shifted the idea of what sides were. He said, “Freedom is not a left and right; it’s an up or down.” It’s either more free or slave, and we want to be in the position of more free.

So, this is where even the other side is not about left and right. It’s about being godly or not godly in this situation, where we want to be people who promote biblical principles. And, grace is certainly one of those principles.

RICK:

That’s so good, and it applies to every issue, not just Second Amendment or other things we are passionate about it. It applies to every single issue. And, as you said, even just a dialogue that’s out there.

So, every one of us can learn from that today, both in our tone on Facebook and in our face-to-face conversations. But, let’s be people of influence. Let us be that positive salt and light.

That’s what salt in life does: it influences the culture, brings out the best in a culture. And, we are blessed to have that truth and get to lead with that into our communities.

We want equip, inspire you, and all those things; so, be sure and visit our website today at WallBuilders.com and also at WallBuildersLive.com. Also, be sure and click on that “contribute” button to become a part of our team by helping to support the radio program.

We appreciate you listening. Thanks for listening to WallBuilders Live!