World War II Veteran and Pastor, Clint Riddle Tells Us His Wartime Stories As Well As How He Was Called Into Ministry

World War II Veteran and Pastor, Clint Riddle Tells Us His Wartime Stories As Well As How He Was Called Into Ministry:  If you have been listening to WallBuilders Live for very long at all, you know how much we respect our veterans and how appreciative we are of the sacrifice they made to make our freedoms possible. One of the ways that we love to honor our veterans is to tell their stories. Today, we are interviewing World War II Veteran Clint Riddle. Tune in now to hear about his story, and experiences in World War II at the Battle of the Bulge, D-Day, and how he was called into the ministry!

Air Date: 11/10/2017


Guests: Clint Riddle, David Barton, Rick Green, and Tim Barton


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Transcription note:  As a courtesy for our listeners’ enjoyment, we are providing a transcription of this podcast.  However, as this is transcribed from a live talk show, words and sentence structure were not altered to fit grammatical, written norms in order to preserve the integrity of the actual dialogue between the speakers. Additionally, names may be misspelled or we might use an asterisk to indicate a missing word because of the difficulty in understanding the speaker at times. We apologize in advance.

Faith And The Culture

Rick:

Welcome to the intersection of faith and the culture.  This is WallBuilders Live! Appreciate you joining us today.

Special program today.  We’re going to dive right into it. We’ve got a World War II veteran with us today. And David and Tim are going to get a chance to visit with him and get his story.

We’re excited to bring that to you. You can find more of these World War II veterans and other veterans, on our website at WallBuildersLive.com in our archive section. Or by getting that really cool CD WallBuilders.com, where we took some of the best of the best of these interviews. Let’s dive into that interview right now with David and Tim interviewing Clint Riddle.

World War II Veteran and Pastor Clint Riddle

David:

This is David Barton and Timothy Barton with WallBuilders Live. And we’re joined now by Clint Riddle who is a World War II veteran. Who participated in some of the hottest and heaviest action that went on in World War II. And has been a pastor for the last several decades. Pastor Riddle, thank you for joining us, brother.  We appreciate it.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I appreciate the opportunity to share.

David:

You went into the army. Why did you choose the army when you went in World War II?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I was drafted December the 10th, 1942. I graduated high school in 1941. And I first went to night school.  Joined Anderson Aircraft School, to learn to build airplanes. The war was progressing, and I knew sooner or later I’d be drafted.

And the contract stated they were not drafting out of school, but after staying there a week I found out the worst. So I came home.  That was in November ‘42.  And I came home and waited to be drafted.

David:

So you got drafted.  You were doing some school with aviation type stuff then. So how did you end up?  I mean, when you went in the army, you ended up being part of the Glider Corps. How did you get assigned there? Was that something you chose?

Riddle Was Drafted and Ended Up In the 325th Glider Infantry

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Oh no.  I took my basic training in Camp Wheeler Georgia. I applied for clerk’s school.  Made good in clerk’s school. And I also made an application for OTS, officers training school. And went for the board and everything.

But they shipped me out to Fort Bragg before I had an opportunity to go to officer’s training school. And upon arriving at Camp Fort Bragg, old sergeant came out a-cursing and said, “What in the world sending these clerks up here? What were need’s machine gun and mortarmen.” So that went my office job.

They put me in the MP’s after a period of time.  They discovered I was two inches too short. I was only 5’6, and had to be 5’8. And so they threw me into the Glider. I had no choice. I served in B-company headquarters, 325th Glider Infantry throughout the war- 82nd Airborne.

David:

You know, I hate to say this.  But the way we teach history today is so bad, that I know good and well that a ton of people have no clue that we used gliders as a significant part of any war ever. They’re so used to seeing the movies and whatnot that-

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Oh, they know so little-

David

That’s right.

A Lot of People Have No Clue That Gliders Were a Significant Part of War

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I try to explain.  I speak in high schools, colleges, universities, a lot a smaller schools.  And always open it up for questions at the end of the speaking. I was speaking Oxford, Tennessee School and opened it up for question.  A little girl raised her hand. I said, “What’s your question, hon.” She said, “What’s a foxhole?”  

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

You know so little.

David:

Wow. Well for glider’s- kind of tell folks why gliders is so important. Because that’s just an unknown part of World War II history for most folks today.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Well, because the crew, the ones that ride the glider- trains together. If they survive the crash landing, then they’re ready to fight. But paratroopers bail out over a long area and have to assemble before they can fight.

David:

And say, how many guys would a glider carry? When you guys-

Veteran Clint Riddle:

It depends on the glider. We used a British Horsa glider, in the invasion of Normandy, held for three men. Usually, CG-4A Waco Glider, American Glider, for the Holland. I was acting copilot going into Holland.

It Was Normal for Gliders Not To Land

Tim:

Pastor, when you mentioned, “If you survived the crash landing.” Was that normal for gliders?   You don’t land?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Oh, yes, yes. We had six gliders in the invasion of Normandy from our company.  And it demolished all of them except the one I was in. We cut the top of a tree off with the left wing and went in and hit awful hard. Hit so hard, I was radioman and carried to field 300 and broke the antennae off of it, and I had to jump out as soon as it kind of come to a stop. And take the antennae off the walkie-talkie and attach it to field 300.  It was the only communication we had until we got another radio.

David:

So out of your company gliders. You’re the only one out of the six that landed intact. Everything else broke up. Wow. I don’t know if you ever watched John Wayne movies, but I remember the “Longest Day.” And I remember this part of that D-Day they showed the gliders coming and they showed a bunch of them cracking up, and how hard it was. That was just kind of pretty standard for what happened. Wasn’t it?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes, Sir,  it was. 11 percent on landing alone and 46 percent casualty overall.

David:

Wow. 11 percent on landing. My goodness.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

The British Horsa glider was so large, it’s made out of plywood. And is large as a 647, and so heavy you had three landing gears. One on the nose, and one on either side. And it hit so hard the front wheel come up through the nose of the floor and cut the men’s legs off who’s sitting on a bench facing each other. So we didn’t want to use British glider for the Holland invasion.

David:

My goodness.

CG-4A Waco- “We Wrote Our Names On the Outside of the Canvas”

Veteran Clint Riddle:

We used the CG-4A Waco.  Got our wishes ******* tubing to only hold thirteen man.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

And by the way, we wrote our names on the outside of the canvas before we left England. And upon landing, I took my trench knife- cut the side out of the glider with the names on it, and folded it and put it in my pocket and I have it framed here at the house.

Tim:

Wow.

David:

Good for you.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Actual a piece I rode from England to Holland on. We landed at St. Mary’s *****, close to it.  And it’s about 14 miles or so, 15 miles, from the coast. Our mission was to keep the bridges and the road open for the incoming troops from the sea.

David:

Wow. So I mean you land behind enemy lines.  And you have to fight your way to the point where you can help your own guys coming in. That’s got to be rugged combat doing that way.

On D-Day, An Old Frenchmen Gave Riddle Fresh Milk

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes, sir. Very, very rough. When we landed, we landed close to the apple orchard which the Germans were throwing in shells. And lo and behold, an old Frenchman is out there milking a cow by hand, and the shells are bursting and all around him. And after I got the antenna fixed on the radio, I started walking up the road very carefully watching for snipers in the trees. When the old Frenchmen got through milking, he came up the road. And when he got even with me, I held my canteen cup out. He filled it full of milk. It wasn’t strained, but it tasted pretty good. That was ten minutes to seven o’clock in the morning.

David:

Wow. Wow. And that was on D-Day?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

D-plus one, yes sir.

David:

D-plus one. You know I saw a piece that when you went back for the 70th, you were going to try to find some of the relatives of that farmer’s family. Did you find any of them?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes.  I- well in ‘94, I got to visit some of the farms. We started to ******Normandy at Jean’s farm. And I had the privilege of going out and meeting Miss Jean and talk with her and a few others. One of the ladies near the beach, I got to speak to her. And in Holland, the weather closed in so they couldn’t find supplies or anything. And Patton went up to one of these other chaplains and prayed a prayer asking the Lord for a few hours of sunshine.

Riddle Was There When Patton Prayed For Better Weather

David:

Yes, sir.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Course, he used some words I wouldn’t dare to use. Somehow, God answered his prayer. Cause the next day, I found myself on top of a tank and we went 14 miles behind the enemy line and took a little village of Regnay.

And when I was there in ‘94, I met a gentleman, who was a boy at that time.  He said he was in the barn peeping out the crack as we went in. And to make sure he wasn’t telling me a story, I asked him which direction we went in.  He described it exactly. When we got there, some of the boys went into the houses and play on the ladies who were baking their Christmas cakes. And they brought me out some.  It’s still warm.

We dug in and stayed.  That’s about 10 o’clock in the morning.  We then firing and knocked out one artillery piece and one escape. And we dug in, and about 10 o’clock in the morning, and stayed till midnight that night.

“I Was a Machine Gunner… And the Life of a Machine Gunner Was 12 Minutes”

And then had to walk back through the enemy line. Montgomery- British general, decided we need to straighten the line. It was an idea.  First time we gave up any land that we had taken. I was a machine gunner on that mission.

The life of a machine gunner was 12 minutes back then. And I started marching.  I threw the machine gun up over my shoulder. And there’s a clasp on the backpack, and it caught on the trigger of the gun and I couldn’t get it down. Of course, you couldn’t stop and talk going through the enemy line. I finally got the attention of one of the boys.   He got it loose.

And being with the headquarter group, I knew exactly how far back they were moving. Along come 155 artillery piece.  I jumped on the barrel of it and rode to where I was supposed to get off.  And I started walking up a road by myself, which is a foolish thing to do.  Because I could’ve been killed or captured.

“I Was a Machine Gunner… And the Life of a Machine Gunner Was 12 Minutes”

And I saw this little house on the side of the road.  I decided to see what was in it. And when I kicked the door open this place where they stored grain. In the corner was a big box, about half full of wheat.

I jumped in that box and covered myself up, all except my head. It’s two o’clock in the morning and slept till daylight. And I went outside and stripped the paper off a K-ration, built me a little fire and warm breakfast. And while I was eating breakfast, I heard some firing going on down the road.

So after I ate, I decided to see who it was.  And it was my company where I was supposed to be. And they were asking me where I’d been, and I never did tell them.

David:

Wow.

Riddle Came Across A Family Praying In Their House As He Went to the Next Room And Set Up His Machine Gun

Veteran Clint Riddle:

And finally, then after we moved back and the Germans finally caught up with us. Some of the engineers cut down trees to try to block their way. But they finally caught up with us.

And that was Christmas Day.  I still had a machine gun. And there was a house nearby.   I decided to see if there was a door to the basement. And when I kick it open, the whole family was down on their knees praying. They had an altar made. I didn’t bother them. I went on to the next room.

Riddle Was Away from Home for Three Christmases

And set the machine gun up in a window. I had to fight the Germans all day, that Christmas Day. I was away from home three Christmas. One, when I first reached the basic camp where I took my training, had a big sign up over the town hall, said, “Welcome soldier. Merry Christmas.” I wondered how in the world I was going to have a Merry Christmas. Didn’t know anybody, had never been nowhere- or done anything.

And the second Christmas, my buddy, foxhole buddy, he was Czechoslovakian- about six foot six, dig a hole big enough for him. And I just scooched up in the crook of his leg, didn’t have to worry about a big hole for me.

He and I joined up with the village girls and made around, and sang Christmas carols to business places.  This is in Ireland. And the last place we made was a director’s house or the pastor’s house, and she was a Canadian. She brought a big platter of cookies out. And so I had a pretty good Christmas.

But the third Christmas was on this trip that I was telling you about.   And had to fight the Germans all day.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

It’s all hush now.

“I Was In Six Battle Zones”

David:

That’s some really amazing Christmases. Man, thank you for doing that. I mean you look back over all the time that you served across North Africa, and you there at D-Day, in the battle of Holland-

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I was in six battle zones.  Four of the invasion.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Quickly, I can give you the places where I served.

David:

Oh, please do. Please do.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

We landed at May the 10th, 1942 Casablanca, North Africa. Served in French, Morocco Algeria, and Tunisia. Made the invasion, Sicily.  Invasion in Italy. Gone around Ireland, served in Ireland. Then moved to England, and went in D-plus one to Normandy, and back to England. And into Holland September 23rd, ‘44. Riddle Is the Only Known Living Survivor From His Company of 155 Men

By the way, we – out of a hundred and fifty-five men in my company, going into D-plus one in Normandy. Only thirty-eight were able to return back to England. The rest had been wounded or killed.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I got word just recently from headquarters, I am the only known living survivor of a hundred fifty-five man originally.

Tim:

Wow.

David:

Wow, wow. What a sacrifice.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

So there’s nobody to tell the story except me.

David:

And you’re writing a book on it. Is that what I hear? That you got a book going?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes, sir.

David:

Good. What caused you to write the book? Why did you want to do that?

Riddle Is Writing A Book Using His Notes and Pictures From the War

Clint Riddle:

Well, I’m an old packrat.  I latch onto everything I get a hold of. My dad always said, “Son, keep it you might need it one day.” So I kept notes during the battle, and I compiled a book after I got home.

David:

And so, I don’t know who else likes it, but I know that myself as a historian, that’s the kind of stuff that we really enjoy getting to read. Because we weren’t there for it. We didn’t see it. And we get it in history books, and it’s dry and often wrong. And having eyewitness accounts of people who were there, like what you’re doing- that’s going to be a treasure.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

We really, we’re not supposed to keep a diary. But I did. And I’m glad I did.

“I Received So Many Calls From Relatives”

David:

Yeah.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I received so many calls from relatives of the boys that was in my company, wanting to know about them. And on the trip from Italy to Ireland, I made around to all the boys in my company and got their home address, their name and their home address in a composition book I found in a school building in Naples, Italy. And I get so many requests from different families asking about their relatives.

For instance, a lady in Oklahoma had been to her grandfather’s funeral. She got my name somewhere and wanted to know if I knew him. And it so happened I had his name and address. I made a copy of it and sent it to her. And says she broke down and began to cry when she saw his hand write.  That happens often.

David:

Boy, that’s wonderful.

Tim:

Pastor, why didn’t they want you to keep a diary or journal during the war?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Because the enemy, being captured.

David:

They were afraid of it getting in enemy hands and having information that would hurt.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes. sir.

Riddle Has Been Back Twice

David:

Yeah, got it. Now I say that you went back on the 50th anniversary of D-Day.  And you went back on the 70th anniversary. So you’ve been back twice.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes, sir. Well. the 50th anniversary was in 1994.

David:

Uh huh.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

We were jumping around different places. But on the Plains of Mook in Holland, we started out attack one morning real early, across a meadow like land.  And there was a fog over us. About halfway across the meadow, the fog lifted. And the German army was in the woods made up of old men and young boys- 10 and 12 years old.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

And they just mowed us down. Killed every officer in our company, except one. And he was buried in a trench row in 1944.  He was not found until 1993. That’s when a farmer decided to plow the pasture field and put in row crop.  He plowed up the lieutenant’s boot. And he notified the officials.  They came out and searched and found his dog tags.   And sent them to high volume for positive identification.

Riddle Was Able to Attend One of His Officer’s Funerals- 50 Years After His Officer Died

So in ‘94, I was there for his funeral. They opened the cemetery up. They closed it, but they opened it to allow him to be buried with his buddies. I was there when he was killed in ‘44, and 50 years later attending his funeral.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Met the family, made them a bunch of pictures. I carried a camera with me over there in combat. I have a number of pictures. If we took a little village and there was a developing unit in a village, I’d leave the films with them and let them process them, and pick up the pictures the next morning when we pulled out.

David:

Wow.

Tim:

Pastor, I’m so curious about these pictures. In the book that you’re doing, is it going to include any of the pictures that you took?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes, sir. I have- my foxhole here in the Battle of the Bulge.

David:

Do you really? Well, did I see that you went back to that foxhole on the 70th anniversary when you went back? Did you find that foxhole?

“I Found One of My Original Foxholes”

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I found…  No, it was the 50th.

David:

It was the 50th.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I found one of my original foxholes.

David:

Wow.

Tim:

Wow.

David:

Wow, original foxhole. And you’ve got a picture of it from when you were there the first time. My goodness.That is something.

The Battle of the Bulge

Veteran Clint Riddle:

The one that I have here in the Battle of the Bulge with snow on the ground and everything.

David:

Wow, wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Oh, it’s so awful cold.

David:

And now, the Battle of the Bulge is one that I think is the stereotypical, on the European side, that’s probably the worst battle everybody thinks of. And on the Pacific side is probably Iwo Jima. But Battle of the Bulge-

Veteran Clint Riddle:

We were the first ones to Bastogne.

David:

Wow.

“We Were the First Ones To Bastogne”

Veteran Clint Riddle:

And when we arrived to Bastogne, they sent us on a little further north to set up a defense line.  Well, for over a month, 101st Airborne was following after us. They had become trapped there when the general said to the Germans on demand of surrender, *********

David:

Yup.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I don’t know whether he knew what that meant or not, but.

David:

That’s right, yep. Colonel McAuliffe I think is the one who did that, as I recall.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Yes, sir.

David:

That’s great.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

That’s correct.

How Riddle Went From Being A Soldier to A Pastor

David:

So you went through D-Day.  You went through the Battle the Bulge. Let me kind of turn toward your post-war years, because we keep calling you “Pastor.”  So how’d you move from being a soldier to being a pastor once you got through World War II?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Well, I was- nearly died when I was 10 years old. I was fresh on a farm. Dad never took me out on the farm to work.  He left me at the house with mother.  I was her little girl growing up. And she taught me how to cook, and sew, and embroider, crochet, and knit, and all that good stuff.

I was saved when I was 14, and I felt a call to the ministry at 15. But being little, I had to prove I was big as anybody. And lo and behold I ended up in the roughest, toughest outfit Uncle Sam had.

David:

Wow.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

They talk about the marine’s being tough.  Some of them wouldn’t make a Boy Scout in the outfit I was in. They threw me in with a bunch of Yankees. They gave me a hard time. Saying, “Isn’t one of your legs long or are you running around in those heels in Tennessee? Does those shoes hurt your feet? Like I’d never had shoes. But most of them turned out to be a pretty good buddy after a while.

Riddle Was Called to Ministry at 15 

David:

Well, that’s something. So you’re- you get called to ministry when you’re 15 years old?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

I felt the call, but I resisted the call.  Didn’t accept it.  It was in Holland after the battle was over. There wasn’t any danger whatsoever. I carried a Testament in my pocket all during the battle. I read it through, going over and to Casablanca, and I read it from time to time as I had time.

Riddle Promised the Lord He’d Do Whatever God Wanted Him to, If God allowed Him to Go Back Home

And I was sitting in the foxhole, reading my Testament and praying.  I finally promised the Lord if He allowed me to come back, I’d do whatever He wanted me to do. Well, I didn’t keep my promise two years after I got back. And in the meantime, I met my future wife. We started going to church occasionally. And this one particular Sunday night, as we sat waiting for the pastor to come, the Lord was speaking to me in his way.

Saying, “Clint, I’ve let you go as far as I’m gonna let you go.” I believe if I tried to walk out that night, He’d have took my life. So I said, “Well, if I have the opportunity, I will answer the call.”

Lo and behold, the pastor had a flat tire, and he had to walk so far to get it fixed. He didn’t make it to church. Well, the chairman of our Deacon, a big tall man. He stood up looked around over the congregation and said, “Well, I wonder if anyone might have a word to say? Looks like our pastor is not going to make it.”

Riddle Answered His Call to Preach Two Years After He Came Back

Well, that was my cue. I answered my calling to preach.  It was in January. And I preached the next Sunday night, my first sermon, 12th of January, 1956.

Lo, what a crowd was there.  Every pew was taken.  They’re standing around in the back. But three was saved that night.

Shortly after I was called in my first church to pastor. I pastored four churches, continuous, going from one to the other for 30 years. And the Lord really blessed.  I’ve seen so many saved, and churches grow. It’s a mystery how that the people just jumped in and helped as a team. It wasn’t anything that I done.  I give the Lord all the glory.

And I was working on the job, working a full-time church, and I finally put me up a shop of my own. I was working about 16-18 hours a day, and it was just too much for me.

I had a heart attack.  Had a blockage, had a heart attack. And I resigned in 1989, my last church.

Since then I’ve served 11 interims. One of them was 26 months, and one was 19- about as long as a lot of pastors stay. And just last week, I spoke and in my 109th church I’d never spoken in before.

David:

Wow.

“The Good Lord Is Still Using Me”

Veteran Clint Riddle:

So the good Lord is still using me, old man.

David:

That’s great. He used you in World War II as a soldier.  Now you’re a spiritual soldier on the other side of that. And by the way, I mean you got decorations for what you did in World War II.  But I read that you got a decoration for fifty-five consecutive years of Sunday school attendance. Is that right?

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Fifty-seven now.

David:

Fifty-seven! That is terrific, Pastor, we so appreciate you sharing your story with us today, brother. We appreciate all you’ve done and all you’re still doing right now. And just thank you for the stories you shared with us, and we’ll look forward to your book coming out.  We’ll be happy to share that when it gets out.

Veteran Clint Riddle:

Well, thank you for the invitation to share.

Share a veteran’s story

We Want To Hear Your Vet Story

Rick:

Hey friends! If you have been listening to WallBuilders Live for very long at all, you know how much we respect our veterans and how appreciative we are of the sacrifice they make to make our freedoms possible. One of the ways that we love to honor those veterans is to tell their stories here on WallBuilders Live.  Once in awhile, we get an opportunity to interview veterans that have served on those front lines that have made incredible sacrifices have amazing stories that we want to share with the American people.

One of the very special things we get to do is interview World War II veterans. You’ve heard those interviews here on WallBuilders Live, from folks that were in the Band of Brothers, to folks like Edgar Harrell that survived the Indianapolis to so many other great stories you heard on WallBuilders Live.

You have friends and family that also served.  If you have World War II veterans in your family that you would like to have their story shared here on WallBuilders Live, please e-mail us at [email protected]  Give us a brief summary of the story and we’ll set up an interview. Thanks so much for sharing here on WallBuilders Live.

Special Thanks to Clint Riddle

Rick:

Welcome back! Thanks for staying with us on WallBuilders Live. Special thanks to Clint Riddle for joining us today as well. David, once again just great to be able to share these stories with our audience. I know they want more of them. They can get them at our website WallBuildersLive.com today.

David:

Well, I tell you, there are so many things that just pop- the average life of a machine gunner was 12 minutes. Are you kidding me?  He walks in the house and the family is there kneeling, and he just walks past them set up machine gun in the other room.  While they stayed there praying, he machine guns in the other room. And then he’s part of that prayer with Patton at the Battle of the Bulge. We have one of those prayer cards.

Tim:

We do. We do.

David:

And he was part of that prayer. And and then he found one of his original foxholes that he dug with his own hand.  Fifty years later he finds his foxhole.

World War II Veteran Clint Riddle’s Phenomenal Story Showcases Why His Generation Was Called “The Greatest Generation”  

Where does it stop with these guys? It is unbelievable what they went through, and what they did. And man, I just, I marvel every time I hear these guys. But Clint’s story- and then speaking- he’s been in 109 churches. Are you kidding? In his 90’s now, and still active in ministry. I’ll love it. This is just such a great guy.

Rick:

Well, phenomenal stories as this generation.  It’s the reason we call them the Greatest Generation. But we’ve lost much of that story, and much of that attitude. So the chance to get to hear those stories, and hopefully pass that attitude on to the next generation and all of us get a little bit of it, is just a great blessing here for us at WallBuilders.

We appreciate you being part of it and listening today. Be sure and share with your friends, your family. You’ve been listening to WallBuilders Live.

2017-11-16T12:00:11+00:00 November 10th, 2017|Military & Veterans|1 Comment

One Comment

  1. Grace Lecara November 10, 2017 at 6:18 pm - Reply

    Incredible story. Awesome veteran! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

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